THE EDUCATION OF DAUNASIA YANCEY
She’s young, black, female, gay—and ready for her mug shot. Meet the new face of Boston’s civil rights movement.
Boston magazine, 3348 words

THE END OF THE ANTHROPOCENE
What do you do when you’re 85 and still at the top of your game? If you’re famed naturalist E. O. Wilson, you discover something you’ve never had: friends.
Boston magazine, 2351 words

A YOUNG PERSON'S GUIDE TO THE ORCHESTRA
A Far Cry rocks harder than your favorite band. But can they save classical music from itself?
The Phoenix, 2969 words

VOICES CARRY
Marty hears things that aren't there. Doctors say she's schizophrenic. A new movement says she's just human.
The Phoenix, 4815 words

TO BOLDLY GO . . . TO FRAMINGHAM
Super Megafest offers the relics of our escapist fantasies.
The Phoenix, 1128 words

OUT OF SILENCE, THE SOUNDS OF HOPE
Stroke victim Erik Ramsey is locked in a world without motion or speech. BU scientists are finding a way to hear what he's thinking.
The Boston Globe, 1371 words

HER ARGUMENT FOR AMPUTATION
Here is Bonnie Denis's right foot: small and calloused and square, the arch bent outward, toes overlapping each other like windblown trees.
The Boston Globe, 945 words

PRISON BREAK
It's not quite charm school, but for these inmates, a little beauty softens the edges of hard time.
The St. Petersburg Times, 1227 words

THE SOUL OF AN ALLIGATOR
He shows no remorse, this 80-year-old man with bright blue eyes and a nose like a boxer's after one round too many. "I'm defending the damn alligators," he says. "Simple as that."
The St. Petersburg Times, 961 words

MORE THAN WORDS CAN SAY
On March 7, 2006, in a parking lot in Dade City, a blood vessel burst in Jose Rodriguez's brain. The St. Petersburg Times, 984 words

BIG ENOUGH TO RIDE IN
You just want to hang out in your giant robot. Is that wrong? The St. Petersburg Times, 817 words